Political Islam: Essays from Middle East Report. Joel …

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Political islam essays from middle east report

“What Kind of Nation? The Rise of Hamas in the Occupied Territories.” In Political Islam: Essays from Middle East Report, Joel Beinin and Joe Stork, eds. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997. Wallach, John and Janet Wallach. The New Palestinians: The Emerging Generation of Leaders. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing, 1992. [See Chapter 9 on Abdul Aziz Rantisi]


Political Islam: Essays from Middle East report

Political islam essays from middle east report magazine - Classic Leather

Medani, Khalid. "Funding Fundamentalism: The Political Economy of an IslamistState." In Political Islam: Essays from Middle East Report, edited byJoel Beinin and Joe Stork. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of CaliforniaPress, 1997.


That context deeply matters and impacts political—and, in our case, Islamist—mobilization, was actually a central theme of earlier Rethinking Political Islam essays and is, more broadly, a well-established argument in the theoretical literature. But there are major issues with viewing this approach as the primary factor explaining the “ideological priorities” and “political alignment” of Islamist groups. Indeed, it implicitly denies them agency and autonomy from their immediate political environment while effectively sidelining complementary theoretical perspectives. What instead appears timely, in a Middle Eastern context marked by repression, civil wars, and state collapse is to look at how national and regional politics impact internal dynamics within these groups. Movements affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood are characterized by a complex decision-making process, thus making their very strategies and ideological platforms the result of virulent debates and internal power struggles. These are sophisticated organizations and informal bureaucracies with an agency of their own.These early struggles, despite their popular appeal, would have few successes beyond Turkey. Yet Turkey is significant. In 1923, Turkey became the first republic in the modern Middle East.27 Mustafa Kemal, or Ataturk, then instituted a series of reforms, including the separation of religion from politics, and carried out what Marxists refer to as “bourgeois democratic tasks,” the reforms needed to mark the transition from a feudal monarchical to a capitalist democratic order. His key battle was against the old order based on Islamic law and practices. To consolidate his own authoritarian rule, he had to destroy the ability of the old ruling classes whose power and authority were tied to Islam. In 1924, he abolished the caliphate, closed down the madrassas or religious schools, replaced Sharia with the Swiss civil code, and expunged the reference to Islam as the state religion of Turkey in its constitution. Ataturk was fiercely secularist, and the Kemalist legacy was carried on by the Turkish army after his death.